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Category: Stitching

8 Embroidery Instagram Accounts We Adore

Embroidery on Instagram

Instagram is a powerful tool to find artists and makers who inspire you. In fact, this is one of the main reasons I love Instagram, I use it to “bookmark” people whose work I want to learn more about. It also makes it a perfect place to find beautiful art you love and see what is happening at the cutting edge of makery.

You could call embroidery an evergreen craft, it has been consistently popular and likely always will. However, this doesn’t mean that the styles stay the same (although you can be sure that everything goes around, even 90’s double denim)! Even the way we display or use embroidery is different to 30 years ago. Now we tend to display embroidery in hoops – a ready made super quick frame that happens to look amazing on the wall. Another use is to embroider our clothes, which is a much more traditional use, but we use modern designs.

Embroidery is thriving among all ages and is something you can start relatively cheaply; learn as you go and can easily take anywhere to do.  Therefore there is no reason we can possibly think of not to start!

These accounts on Instagram are brilliant places to explore and get the bug or find the type of embroidery that suits you! Some like @petronella.art and @_charleshenry_ also lead online embroidery courses if you love their style and want to learn more about their process.


So here are the 8 embroidery accounts on Instagram we adore:

@petronella.art

Who is she: Originally from Falsterbo in Sweden, Elin Petronella now lives mostly in France and embroiders buildings, landscapes and landmarks that she sees on her everyday travels. She hand draws out an intricate sketch and then converts that drawing into an embroidery pattern to stitch. She travels with her fiance, another embroidery artist called Charles Henry and together they have a website called Le Kadre. From Le Kadre you can buy finished pieces, patterns and online courses; they also have a joint Instagram account as well, @thetravellingartists.

Embroidery Style: Architectural embroidery of street scenes, landscapes and landmarks. She uses vibrant colours and a strong outline with particular attention often paid to objects like bikes or vegetation which add to the structure of the scene. Her pieces are almost always created and displayed in wooden hoops and are designed with a circle viewpoint in mind. 

Instagram Style: Expect beautiful photos of her travels with both urban and coastal landscapes; gorgeous progress photos of embroidered pieces being made and videos of her process. You will also be treated to amazingly envy making photos of places she sits to relax and embroider such as sun-drenched beaches or in front of stunning landmarks. You won’t just find embroidery though as she also knits and makes her own clothes and bags.  She also regularly posts about her life with Charles Henry (see below) as they work and travel together. 

Why should you follow her: If you love architectural style embroidery and beautiful photos of France and the Continent then this is your sort of account. Her account has a very happy vibe and is a perfect place to learn more about architectural embroidery.

 

Links

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/petronella.art/?hl=en

Instagram for The Travelling Artists: https://www.instagram.com/thetravellingartists/?hl=en

Facebook page for Le Kadre: https://www.facebook.com/lekadre/

Le Kadre website: https://lekadre.com/

 

@_charleshenry_

Who is he: He is a Paris born embroidery and illustration artist who like his fiance, @petronella.art, embroiders landmarks and street scenes, he also stitches portraits. As the other half of Le Kadre, they lead workshops, create patterns and sell their work all over Europe and beyond. He hand draws out the pattern first and these sketches are usually just as brilliant as the finished embroidered piece. 

Embroidery Style: His pieces switch between black/blue line stitched outline embroidery with no other colour apart from vivid multicolour skies or seas. His other embroidery style being architectural where he uses many colours and lots of texture. Like @petronella.art he uses hoops to display his pieces but sometimes he also converts stitched pieces into prints.

Instagram Style: Similar in style to @petronella.art in that you can expect lots of beautiful embroidery pieces in progress interspersed with photos of him stitching in front of beaches or famous landmarks. He also shows what life as half of a travelling artist couple is like with regular photos of the two of them. Both of their feeds show a deep appreciation that we should all try to love the little things in life and he often posts positive messages or something to make you think.

Why should you follow him: You will be seeing real-life scenes and people being literally sewn in front of your eyes though progress shots and videos. It is also really good that both he and @petronella.art show the location or scene they are stitching as well as the finished piece as it gives you a real insight into the finished likeness. and can get a really good feel of what architectural embroidery consists of. You will also love (and suffer huge jealousy pangs for) the shots of him stitching in front of gorgeous locations.

🌞 The embroidery is finished !☄🎨❤ It's not easy to finish a piece, I always had this problem in art school or even in my old job, I was never satisfied with my work. After 1 month and a half to embroider on this piece, I'm happy but there are always details that can bother me. With the experience I learned to hold my choices and to know how to say stop, the piece is finished. This piece was a memory of Paris, my hometown, which I was happy to leave for new adventures, it will always remain a city of my heart, and we will come there from time to time because my mother lives there. Each city has its own state of mind, that's how it is, that's why we often have preconception about the people who live there. I have tried it but I never really had the spirit of #Paris. Nature, the ocean, the small communities is more my kind of spirit. But without Paris maybe Elin and I would not be here at the moment of today making our passion a lifestyle. This #embroidery is located at Quai des Orfèvres not far from the Pont-Neuf, it is a place known for this large anti-criminal police station, and also known for its history and its majestic architecture. I now feel ready for the next piece, full of ideas in mind, I hope you'll be there! If you are interested in purchasing "Quai des Orfèvres" please email : hello@lekadre.com 🌻 . . . #lekadre #broderie #bordado #handembroidery #handmade #needlework #needlepainting #diy #closeup #manbroidery #artistofinstagram #artstudio #artforsale #embroideryartist #seineriver #sky #paintingoftheday #artoftoday #contemporaryartist #needleart #patienceiskey #dmcembroidery #vangogh #tribute #menstyle #detailedart #finearts #fineartist

A post shared by CHARLES HENRY (@_charleshenry_) on

 

Links

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/_charleshenry_/?hl=en

Instagram for The Travelling Artists: https://www.instagram.com/thetravellingartists/?hl=en

Facebook page for Le Kadre: https://www.facebook.com/lekadre/

Le Kadre website: https://lekadre.com/

 

@kirikipress

Who is she: Kiriki Press started when Michelle Galletta, actually a printmaking graduate from the Ontario College of Art and Design in Canada; wanted to make an embroidered doll for her niece. She couldn’t find a pattern gorgeous enough, with existing ones being either too simplistic or too old-fashioned. After learning how to embroider she then designed and made a trio of embroidered owls. She has featured in a whole host of craft blogs, magazines and books and continues to create new designs featuring embroidered animals, characters and samplers.

Embroidery Style: She uses a myriad of different stitches to create the looks she wants for each character with colours suited to whichever character she is currently embroidering, each of the animals is very realistic and very cute. The simplest creations may only feature a few different stitches while advanced pieces may almost completely cover the fabric to create a fully textured piece.

Instagram Style: As you would imagine it mostly shows her creations in various states of creation and with lovely backgrounds. It also features characters made by people who have followed her patterns to create their own pieces. It is brilliant to see when she shows the original sketches for some of the designs as it is always really interesting to see how people design their work and how it differs or is similar to other artists.

Why should you follow her: If you love cute embroidery and sumptuous backdrops then this is perfect for you. 

 

 

 Links

Website – https://www.kirikipress.com/

Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/kirikipress/?hl=en

Facebook – facebook.com/kirikipress

Twitter – twitter.com/KirikiPress

Pinterest – pinterest.com/kirikipress

 

@brynnandcoshop

Who is she: Amanda Bryde is Canadian by birth but now lives in Queensland, Australia. She runs her business, Brynn & Co, alongside having a young family and working full time. Having always been creative with photography, writing, crochet and sewing; she then fell in love with embroidery and started her business. Her dream is to be able to support her family by selling patterns and kits of her designs alongside sewing aids.

Embroidery Style: Positive words left as blank fabric then beautifully surrounded with embroidered flowers and plants. She also uses occasionally uses black outline stitches with a pop of colour to show off a feature.

Instagram Style: Think clean, beautifully lit and posed photos of her work, both finished and in progress. New ideas for her projects and collaborations with other artists.

Why should you follow her: If you like gorgeous embroidery flatlays and innovative ways to use embroidery in everyday life then this account is perfect.

 

Links

Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/brynnandcoshop/?hl=en

Pinterest – https://www.pinterest.com.au/amandalbryde/

 

@timesnewromance

I can’t find very much information about this artist but her work is fabulous so enjoy!

Embroidery Style: Brilliant innovative black outline portrait embroidery with hair features added beautifully using threads. Faces are spot on and I just love the texture that the threads give to the hair on the portraits. Some pieces she creates are huge and almost life-sized while others are tiny.

Instagram Style: Pared down images of in-progress and finished work always against simple backgrounds. Occasional shots of her stitching and her inspirations.

Why should you follow her:  So creative and innovative in how she frames, poses and stitches her portraits, it is a joy to see what she does next.

 

 

Links

Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/times.new.romance/?hl=en

 

@tessa_perlow

Who is she: Tessa Perlow is from New Jersey in the USA and creates upcycled clothes and textiles by filling them with colourful embroidery art. She sells these pieces as unique one-off clothes.

Embroidery Style: Bold, vibrant and modern embroidery that veers from florals to human hearts and geometric patterns. Each garment or textile she creates is unique from any of her other pieces and all are brilliant. She also stitches hoop art, mostly featuring eyes in some way.

Instagram Style: You can expect lots of vibrant in-progress and finished images of her upcycled pieces with her either wearing them or in the hoop being created. Images of her gorgeous cats, plus dreamy photos from her trips.

Why should you follow her: The sheer variety and imagination of her work mean each piece is different and it’s exciting to see what her next design will be. If you love bold, modern embroidery and upcycling then this is perfect for you.

 

~Pure heart contour tee~ #embroidery

A post shared by ⚡️Tessa⚡️ (@tessa_perlow) on

Links: 

Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/tessa_perlow/?hl=en

 

 

@rachelwinters_sewing

Who is she: Rachel Winters is from Georgia in the USA and creates flower-rich embroidery hoop art. She sells her designs as PDF patterns and as finished hoop art.

Embroidery Style: She uses a variety of different stitches to create gorgeous floral pieces, sometimes with beautifully stitched birds, both for hoop art and for embroidering on clothes. Love the way she creates brilliant texture on some of the flowers using longer lengths of thread.

Instagram Style: Gorgeous close-ups and flatlays of her embroidery both finished and in progress plus sketches of her designs being created.

Why should you follow her: Her feed is gorgeously full of embroidered flowers and birds and if you love nature- inspired embroidery then this is the feed for you.

 

✨New hand embroidered hoops are now on my Etsy Shop. Link in my profile ✨

A post shared by rachelwinters_sewing (@rachelwinters_sewing) on

Links:

Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/rachelwinters_sewing/?hl=en

 

@defnegunturkun

Who is she: Based in Istanbul, Defne Güntürkün designs fabric patterns featuring nature-inspired themes so when she developed a love for embroidery it made sense that these themes would make their way into her embroidery. She has been designing fabrics for over 15 years so this experience helps her to choose colour combinations that work well together as well as decisions on how to incorporate new plants or objects into her pieces. She sells her embroideries through her website and through her studio in Istanbul.

Embroidery Style:  Nature-inspired pieces featuring beautiful floral filled initials; realistic character filled portraits and lots of cacti! She also creates stitched pins and buttons in a variety of designs. Her portraits are mostly stitched on felt.

Instagram Style: Videos of her work being stitched, allowing you to see her process. Photos of her work finished and in progress plus photos of her gorgeous studio.

Why should you follow her: Her portraits are gorgeous to watch being created and if like us you love watching the stitches transform the blank fabric and create a work of art, then this account is for you too.

 

 

Links:

Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/defnegunturkun/?hl=en

Website – https://www.defnegunturkun.com/about

 

 

All these artists are inspirational, innovative and hugely creative talents and will fill your feed up with brilliance and loads of stitchy goodness. Enjoy!

If you enjoyed this post then have a read of some of our other posts here

Or if you want to have a browse of our craft kits then you can find our home page here 

10 embroidery stitches to take you from beginner to master

It is a subject of common knowledge (and quite a few popular books) that you only need to know a few chords on a guitar to open you up to be able to play a whole rainbow’s worth of music. Of course learning new chords afterwards is great and can make your playing varied and even more fun but effectively you can do an awful lot with just those few chords and a willing spirit. Embroidery is actually pretty much the same. While it’s great to know how to stitch a huge range of different stitches you can actually get away with just mastering 10 stitches to make huge numbers of gorgeous pieces.

So here I’ll show you, with photographs, how you can stitch these 10 stitches quickly and easily and start your journey from embroidery newbie to stitch master!


  • Running Stitch:

    Technique:

    There are two methods for doing running stitch, just choose which you like best.

    METHOD 1– First knot the end of your thread and come up through the back of the material until the knot hits the material, now make one stitch by going down through the material again a small distance away.

    Now (as shown in Photo 1) weave your needle in and out of the fabric to create the stitches and pull through. Photo 2 shows the completed stitches.

    Running stitch 1 method 1 resized
    Photo 1 – Running stitch method 1
    finished method 1 running stitch
    Photo 2 – Method 1 completed

    METHOD 2 –  The second method is just to go up and down normally and do your stitches individually. See Photo 3.

    method 2 running stitch
    Photo 3 – Running stitch method 2
    Where to use running stitch:
    1. Decoratively, to create a border or line.
    2. To gather material together.
    3. In appliqué (where you sew smaller fabric shapes onto another larger piece of fabric to create a pattern or picture.)
    4. To hold pieces of fabric together temporarily before properly stitching.

 

  • Back Stitch

Technique:

Backstitch is a lovely simple stitch which again starts with you knotting the end of your thread. Now come up from the back and make one stitch by going down again. Now come up a stitch’s worth amount from your first stitch and then go back down the hole from the first stitch (see Photo 4) covering over where you left the gap. It’s easier to demonstrate with pictures and a diagram as it sounds so much more complicated than it is!

 

backstitch diagram

 

You come up at 1 and go back down at 2, back up at 3 and then back down at 4 and so on.

 

 

 

 

back stitch start
Photo 4 – starting to backstitch
back stitch
Photo 5 – Completed Backstitches
Where to use backstitch:
  1. Decoratively, for lines or borders.
  2. To stitch words or outlines.

 

  • Straight Stitch

Technique:

diagram straight stitch

Super simple and perfect for filling up shapes. Just come up from the back at point 1 and back down at point 2, then start again at a completely different angle.

 

straight stitch
Photo 6 – Completed straight stitch

 

Where to use straight stitch:
  1. To fill up large shapes and to create texture.

 

  • Chain Stitch

 

Technique:
chain stitch diagram
Photo 7 – Starting chain stitch

 

Come up  from the back with your needle,  go back down at 1 (next to where you began) and come up at 2, before pulling through catch the thread around the left side of the needle as shown in Photo 7.

chain stitch in progress
Photo 8 – Continuing to chain stitch

 

 

 

 

 

To continue chain stitching just follow the same technique but go through the middle of the last chain as shown in Photo 8.

completed chain stitch
Photo 9 – Completed chain stitches
Where to use it:
  1. To outline words and shapes.
  2. Decorative borders.

 

 

 

 

  • Lazy Daisy

 

Technique:

This is basically a variant of chain stitch so once you can do that you can do this! Start by knotting the end of your thread, coming up from the back and then going back down next to where you came up from, creating a loop. Come up again where you want the tip of the “petal” to be and thread through the loop (see photo 10). Pull through and then make a very small stitch to hold the loop in place (see Photo 11).

lazy daisy 1
Photo 10 – Starting the lazy daisy

 

lazy daisy diagram
Photo 11 – Numbered diagram for the lazy daisy stitch. Come up at 1 and down at 2, keep a loop and come up again at 3 before capturing the loop by going down at 4.

Now come back up in the middle and start again (Photo 12), create the petals until your flower shape is complete (Photo 13).

lazy daisy in progress
Photo 12 – Lazy daisy stitch in progress.
completed lazy daisy
Photo 13 – Completed lazy daisy flower, you can add a centre or just leave as is.
Where to use it:
  1. To create flowers, petals, leaves or seeds.

 

 

  • French Knots

 

Technique:

First knot the end of the thread and then come up with your needle from the back, now using your fingers wrap the thread 3 times around the needle tip towards you (Photo 14) and hold the working thread while you push the needle back down next to where you came up (Photo 15). Pull steadily and slowly until a knot is formed (Photo 16).

french knot thread wrapping
Photo 14 – Wrapping the thread around the needle to form a French knot

 

french knot 2
Photo 15 – going back down to form the French knot
Competed French knots
Photo 16 – Completed French knots

 

Where to use it:
  1. Decorative filling
  2. To form part of or the whole of plants, flowers or seeds

 

  • Stem Stitch

 

Technique:

Come up from the back and, using Photo 17 to help demonstrate, up at 1, down at 2 and then back up again at 3 (point 3 is halfway between points 1 and 2) so that the stitches sit neatly on top of each other (Photo 18).

stem stitch instructions
Photo 17 – Beginning to stem stitch

 

stem stitch 2
Photo 18 – clearer image of a stem stitch sequence before you pull the thread.
Stem stitch completed
Photo 19 – Completed series of stem stitches
Where to use it:
  1. To outline writing
  2. To create stems, twigs and branches
  3. For decorative borders

 

 

  • Satin Stitch

Technique

Draw with pencil or chalk the shape you would like to satin stitch (photo 20), this makes it much easier to make sure you are staying on target.

satin stitch 1
Photo 20 – draw your shape in first to help guide your stitches.

 

It’s down to personal preference but I like to start at the widest point and work out, this is usually the middle of a shape. You come up from the back and go straight across the design and down, as shown in  Photo 21. You then come back up just next to where you started on the left but slightly down. This means that you get a well covered shape with no gaps. Remember not to pull the thread to tight otherwise it will start to gather.

satin stitch 1st stitch
Photo 21 – I like to start in the middle, come up and then go straight across the design and down. Then come back up next to where you started on the left.

 

satin stitch almost done
Photo  22 – Almost finished satin stitched shape

 

satin stitch completed
Photo 23 – Completed shape

Where to use satin stitch

  1. To give a solid filling to shapes or writing
  2. For petals and leaves

 

 

 

  • Cross Stitch

Technique

You might think that this stitch belongs exclusively to cross stitch but it is also fantastic in embroidery as well. It is as simple as it sounds but it is important to always stitch it in the same order as it will show if you change the order you stitch it. As shown in Photo 24, come up at 1 and across and down at 2, up again at 3 and down at 4.

cross stitch method image 1
Photo 24 – come up at 1, down 2, up at 3 and down at 4.

 

cross stitch complete
Photo 25 – Completed cross stitches

 

Where to use cross stitch
  1. As a decorative filling
  2. For borders

 

  • Blanket Stitch

Technique

(These instructions are if you are stitching two pieces of fabric together) Knot the end of your thread and go down through the bottom fabric piece only, this will hide your knot between the two layers (Photo 26). Make your first stitch by now going through the two layers from the top, this creates a loop and your first stitch (Photo 27).  Push the needle sidewards through first stitch and between the middle opening of the two layers to anchor it and make the thread appear on the left hand side of that first stitch.

 

 

Now using Photo 28 to illustrate, go down from the top a short distance away from your last stitch and make sure the thread loops behind the needle so that when you pull it together it looks like Photo 29. Just carry on doing this all the way around the piece you are stitching until you are back to where you started. Then slide your needle sidewards through your first stitch and then again to make a loop, now pass your needle through that loop so you have a knot.

blanket stitch
Photo 28 – Blanket stitch in progress. Go down from the top a short distance away from your last stitch and make sure the thread loops behind the needle.

 

blanket stitch loop
Photo 29 – The loop forming
Where to use blanket stitch
  1. For decorative borders
  2. Appliqué
  3. To sew two edges together decoratively

 

I really hope you have found this whistle-stop tour of embroidery stitches useful. Embroidery is so rewarding, not just because it is relaxing and therapeutic but also because it is something that has no parameters so you can literally stitch your imagination!

Please send in pictures of your completed embroidery masterpieces, I’d love to see them!

For more blog articles like this as well as articles on craft, wellbeing and nature then please follow this blog or follow Cre8kits on Twitter, Facebook and Pinterest.

3 Ways to use your odd socks up on lost sock memorial day

We all have them, spare odd socks that seem to appear with monotonous regularity in our sock drawers. To compound matters they are usually the ones that are completely different to every other sock you possess so there is no chance of trying to get away with matching any of your odd socks together. So this Lost Sock Memorial Day why not use those odd socks for something useful and stop them continuing to bung up your sock drawer!

What to do with all those socks?

  • Sock Puppets

This may be a very obvious spare sock use but it is still a brilliant one! You can create any number of different characters and animals and with a bit of imagination they are great for using in educational play as well – such as animal and colour recognition or counting  for example.

Making a sock puppet couldn’t be more simple, you can use felt, wiggly eyes, embroidery, pom poms, ribbons, glitter glue, marker pens and wools to decorate and personalise the sock. You usually have the heel on the top of your hand with the upside down toe end as the nose or mouth. Once decorated just slip your hand inside and start playing! Themed collections of puppets from stories or nursery rhymes are brilliant or animals from habitats children are learning about e.g. polar or pond.

  • Sock dog chew

If your dog is anything like ours then a carelessly discarded sock is an instant invitation to carry it around all day, slobbering and chewing as they go (thinking about it, that’s probably why I have so many odd socks)!

pug and sock

Protect your favourite socks and sacrifice some old and holey ones to make dog toys your best friend will love! There are loads of different ways to do this and no one way is better than another as long as the stitches are secure and not loose or broken. If they are then fix it straight away or take the toy away from your dog until you have time.

One option is to cut two socks into strip tubes pieces, each about 5cm wide. Turn all the pieces inside out and securely sew each of the strip tube pieces together, alternating colours and patterns to give a patchwork effect, creating a long sausage tube of colour or pattern stripes. Sew the one end of the tube up but leave the other open for now, turn the chew the right way round and stuff with more odd or holey socks. Now sew the other end up using ladder stitch.

sock strip for dog chew

Another popular option is to cut two small simple shape pieces out of the sock, sew together using blanket stitch and stuff with a sewn up inner bag containing dried beans, this inner bag will help make it more robust. You can then use it as a bean bag throw toy. Obviously alter the size of the beanbag to your dog’s size, so for example don’t make a jumbo size toy with a huge weight of beans for a Chihuahua and conversely don’t give a Great Dane a toy that they might choke on!

If you want to add a bit of character to your dog toys then embroider faces or motifs but again always make sure there is nothing for your dog’s teeth to get stuck in.

  • Phone or MP3 Player Sock

phoneBrilliant for keeping phones or music players clean and scratch free in handbags (nearly impossible normally). You can make your “sock” as fancy and complicated or as simple and quick to make as you want.

Probably the simplest and quickest method is to first use your phone to measure how big it needs to be and add about 10cm to that measurement to allow for sewing up and the “popper seam”. Cut across the sock at this point so that you effectively have a tube. If you are able to then try to use the open top of the sock, this will already be seamed so it will make things easier to use it as the top of the phone sock and where you add the poppers to. If you do have this top intact then you can reduce the amount of added measurement you allow and just have 5cm extra on top of the length of your phone.

phone sock how to image

Turn the tube inside out and sew the one end up completely. If you haven’t got the original top intact then create a 5cm seam on the other end. This will be where you sew your poppers on to so it needs to be a wide flat seam. Turn your phone sock the right side out and sew on two sets of poppers at equidistant distance on the inside of the sock (where your seam is). This means there is less pressure than just having one and less risk of stretching and the poppers coming off.  Slide your phone inside for that perfect “made to measure in 15 minutes” feeling.  Glam this up with embroidered writing or patterns or add a felt lining to make it extra plush.

There are so many other ways you can celebrate your odd socks. Experiment now you are started on the path to freeing these lonely socks from sock drawer prison! 

You can keep in touch with our blog posts by following us on here or by following Cre8kits on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest, we also have a newsletter you can sign up to on our website http://www.cre8kits.co.uk.

This article was posted on our original blog site Cre8ty on the 9th May 2017.

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